National Theatre

Located in Max-Joseph-Platz, in Munich, Germany, the National Theatre is an opera house. It is home of the Bavarian State Ballet and the Bavarian State Opera. The first theater was made by the order of king Maximilian of Bavaria and was created by Karl von Fischer, keeping Odéon of Paris as the basis.

Munich National Theatre

Munich National Theatre

The theater opened with Ferdinand Fränzl’s Die Weihe in 1818, but soon got ruined by fire in 1823. Immediate reconstruction took place and in 1825 it got re-opened. Designed by Leo von Klenze, the second theater included Neo-Grec features, as is visible in its triangular pediment and its portico.

To produce a larger stage area, the building was modified in 1930, and updated equipments were added. It got destroyed in October 1943 during the World War II. The original neo-classical 2100-seat theater was recreated by Gerhard Moritz Graubner, keeping the original plans of Karl von Fischer as its basis. The new building is a bit larger than the precursor and just the main staircase and the foyer maintained the original look.

It opened with Richard Wagner’s Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg on November 22, 1963. Some of the world famous premieres staged in the National Theater include Tristan and Isolde by Richard Wagner, Das Rheingold by Richard Wagner, Sarema by Alexander von Zemlinsly and Der Bärenhäuter by Siegfried Wagner.

Munich National Theatre

Munich National Theatre

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